CAPITOL HISTORY

Michigan’s present Capitol—the state’s third—has a long and interesting history dating back to the 1800s. In 1992 it was designated a National Historic Landmark by the United States Secretary of the Interior, meaning that the Michigan State Capitol is recognized as a nationally significant historic site that possesses exceptional value to the people of our country. Explore the history of Michigan’s Capitol—from art and architecture to technology and politics—here.

Michigan’s Three Capitols
Michigan has had three capitol buildings, and two capitol cities.

Capitol Building
Learn more about some of the most significant rooms in the Michigan State Capitol.

Capitol Square
Capitol Square is home to beautiful Victorian-inspired flower beds.

A Capitol Idea
The Michigan State Capitol is partnering with the Library of Michigan to showcase and share images, historical documents, and other Capitol treasures! This collection will continue to grow, so check in frequently!

Michigan Legislative Biography Database
Over 5,500 people have served in the Michigan Legislature since the state was founded in 1835. Learn more about individual members or groups of legislators by using the Library of Michigan’s Legislative Biography Database.

Upcoming Capitol History Programs


A Woman's Place is Under the Dome
Join us for a new virtual tour celebrating the 2020 Woman's Suffrage Centennial! The tour will focus on Michigan's three Capitols as the settings for some of the most important moments in the 75 year battle for equal suffrage in our state. Registration required: capitoltourguides@legislature.mi.gov.

Rise and Progress: Stories from the Michigan State Capitol

A new series of monthly virtual educational programs about Capitol history, culture and people. Check back every month for a new topic!
Registration required: capitoltourguides@legislature.mi.gov.


The east, or main, first floor corridor in the Michigan State Capitol c. 1910.
The east, or main, first floor corridor in the Michigan State Capitol c. 1910. Note the intricate cage elevator between the left columns.
Image Courtesy of the Michigan State Capitol Archive, Lawler Collection